Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
FOXNEWS 24
CSPAN 19
CNNW 12
KQED (PBS) 12
MSNBCW 12
CSPAN2 11
MSNBC 8
WHUT (Howard University Television) 8
KRCB (PBS) 7
WETA 6
FBC 5
CNN 4
KNTV (NBC) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 197
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 197 (some duplicates have been removed)
playing a key role in managing israel's overt campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let get out on the stage the duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution the world cannot tolerate iran with a nuclear capability vali nasr and fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] vali nasr leads john hopkins school of international study, he is one of the world's top exerts in the political and social developments of iran. he is the author of two best- selling books. he sits on the state department's influential board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're
israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let's get out on the stage the equally forbiddable duo who will be orging -- arguing. leading johns hopkins prestigious school. born in tehran one of the world's top experts on the political and social development of iran. and he's the author of two best selling books, the shia revival and democracy on the iran. served as a senior advisor recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, former munk bedator. now, when you think of provocktiff conversation on the big foreign policy challenges of the day you have to think about our next debator. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the "washington post" and is the editor at large of time magazine. his numerous best-selling books include the post american world and the future of freedom. now, we are just moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements once ag
an unprecedented retreat. now come to israel, where talks are already underway about building a new coalition government. put they's ballot alliance led by benjamin netanyahu -- and left him in a substantially weaker position. there is a young, centrist party. we have this report from jerusalem. >> thrusting himself and his centrist party onto center stage. after a long night, about his probable role in the coalition government, a potential newcomer, he told the bbc before the election exactly what he stands for. >> somebody has to be the voice of the middle class. there is a dispute with the palestinians. we came into the political arena to become that voice. >> benjamin netanyahu is expected to bring him into a new, broad government. the government was weakened by yesterday's vote, but net non remains prime minister. he is being urged to put together as broad coalition as possible, reflecting the day-to- day concerns of the secular is really is. perhaps, some of the ultra- orthodox religious parties and recent governments. after nationwide protests last year, the high cost of living in isra
in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the count h moved dramically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american nsulate in benghazi, libya. four amerins we killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat se
in the region who all border syria, turkey, jordan, israel, also lebanon. and the potential for a sectarian divide between shiites and sunnis that could spread from syria, exacerbate the tensions that are already there in iraq and then down to the gulf. >> you have the arab revolution's lead to now the rise of these islamist authoritarian governments. what are the consequences of that? in syria you talk about al qaeda presence. it's unlikely an al qaeda affiliated group will take over syria or egypt. greater likelihood perhaps in egypt and not even there. what is american influence look like -- what should it look like in this post revolutionary period when there was so much excitement about the prospect of egyptian democracy taking root in way that would be in concert with the u.s. at a time when there are people very critical of the o bama administration for essentially getting out of the way, letting the revolution happen and then turning their backs on the likes of mubarak who could have at least guaranteed some level of stability? >> i think it was an illusion to imagine that we could
conclude with a look at two recent elections in the middle east, one in jordan and one in israel. we talk with jordan's ambassador to the united nations prince bin ra'ad and efraim halevy. >> when we first heard the rumblings of the arab spring some may have thought that thises with a train that was passing through the station in and out. i think his majesty understood full well that these were seismic rumblings. and the region has had for a long time been bereft of real reforms. his majesty began earlier on. and i think you know now felt that for those who had a vested interest in the stat usco, this is their time to understand-- status quo, this is their time to understand something is changing. >> there is something much more deep that going to happen in the months to am come and there have before been a few indications of this in the last 48 hoursment and that is that the problem of the relationship between religion and state between those who are orthodox and trawl orthodox and those who are to a large extent secular, how to create a society in which you have common aims, common beli
security team. >> under fire for his past statements about israel and iran. hagel is now speaking out. told his hometown newspaper "lincoln journal star." the distersions about my record have been astounding. once voicing opposition to unilateral sanctions on iran, hagel says while he was "hanging out there in no man's land unable to respond to charges, falsehoods and indistortions, he admitted they took on a life of their own." he's arguing that there's "not one shred of evidence that i'm anti-israeli. nat one vote that matters that hurt israel." hagel defending his iran stance saying unilateral sanctions, "don't work and just isolate the united states." republican critics many who bitterly remember his split from the iraq war are focusing on iran and israel. >> he's an honorable man. he's had a record of distinguished service, but he's profoundly wrong on a number of the most important national security issues that face our country today. >> but this issue of israel and iran is something the white house is nervous about. they began a feverish lobbying effort talking to key leaders of key
a situation in israel which hundreds of thousands of israelis do not have a personal status in the country. >> rose: change in syria, israel and jordan when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >>> a polar bear cub is born with no sense of sight. we are a decisional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city this is dharl charlie rose. >> the arab spring reached syria nearly two years ago when residents of a small southern city protested the government's tover ture of students. today those protests erupted into one of the post deadly civil yars in syrian history. over 400,000 refugees have fled the war-torn country, opposition remains fragmented and in some cases disorganized but as the violence escalates, the international community may have to decide when and how to intervene am joining me cbs news correspondent clarissa ward. she has spent much of the past year reporting from inside sirria. she is one of the only journalists to tell this stor
in 1981. and most recently, up until 2010, playing a key role in managing israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. ladies and gentlemen, major general retired adlin. [applause] now, let's get out on the stage the equal request formidable duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution, be it resolved the world cannot tolerate an iran with nuclear weapons capability. vali nasser and fareed zakaria. [applause] well, dean vali nasser leads john hopkins university's press contingentous school of advanced international studies, born in tehran, he's one of the world's top experts on the political and social developments of iran. and he's the author of two best-selling books, "the shi'a revival" and "democracy in iran." he sits on the state department's influential foreign affairs policy board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, a former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy
, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by the pentagon investigation going back to the petraeus case. thanks to all of you, david sanger and kelly o'donnell, of course, and chris cillizza, see you later. thanks very much. >>> clinton today put a lot of blame on congress for withholding aid. >> we have to get our act together between the administration and congress. if this is a priority and if we are serious about trying it help this government stand up
these publics most intensely of grievances, including grievances against the united states and israel and most importantly against their own unrepresentative pro-western government in regime. amendment the islamic republic has done is aligned itself with public opinion at south in the middle east to constrain hostile governments from attacking a. just think about how barbering largely shia population would react to the fleetest our fifth fleet based in bahrain to attack the islamic republic today. u.s. military planners could hope that the iran's population would be passive as they think they assumed maybe even five years ago. but today it clearly seems reckless. for other ridiculing many american policy elites do with the islamic republic, the appeal to regional public actually works. it works to constrain the united states and hostile, unrepresentative pro-western neighboring iran. iran is also the two reinforce these aspects of a software strategy of a number of years at picking what we would call winners, zero, hamas, hezbollah, shia groups, even the muslim brotherhood political ally and k
into egypt, threaten israel. there were very important reasons why we were there, not just the state department, but other government agencies. whether or when we go back will depend upon the security situation. >> all of that and much more ahead. but first, on the heels of president obama blasting rush limbaugh and fox news, democratic senator mary landrieu taking a shot of her own at fox. >> i am not going to keep cutting the discretionary budget, which by the way, is not out of control, despite what you hear on fox news. >> so is this trend going to continue? what do they get out of it? former speaker of the house, newt gingrich is here. at least president obama and senator landrieu put the straw man up there, apparently, fox news is their straw man. >> they're very different arguments. mary landrieu's argument, with all due respect is nuts. the idea that discretionary spending's not too high, the idea that this government's not too big, the idea that the deficit isn't too large, this is not a fox news problem, this is a wash politician problem. i think they can try to find somebo
. in a few moments, a look at how the u.s. and israel should respond to the nuclear program. a forum on polling and the presidential election. a focus on the debate for aids and victims of hurricane sandy. >> i tend to flip over to the senate every now and again, especially if there is something important going on. coverage of the floor. the c-span has it. i even listen to c-span radio in my car sometimes if it is there. >> c-span, treated by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public-service by your television provider. now, a forum on iran's nuclear program. this debate includes a look at u.s. and israel policy in the middle east. ♪ >> i never heard such a stupid thing. [laughter] [indiscernible] >> then you have to come back and you are shaken up. >> i have yet to hear a serious argument from either of these two. no, no, you have had your say. >> you have got to say something. >> i am not prepared to sacrifice for some free market ideology. ♪ >> we are all in this. running a trade surplus unless we can find another to sell to. >> we remain on like japan. the
of israel tonight. this, as the united states is providing a gift to egypt and muslim brotherhood member, president of e jupt, morsi. four f [laughter] 16 fighter jets left the country for egypt today part of a foreign aid package including 200 abe brame's tanks, and urged urged -- joining us now is andrew mccarthy, former federal prosecutor, convicted the blind shake, and he's also author ever the book "spring fever. illusion of islamic democracy," andrew, great to have you with us. start with, first, these developments. sending this aid to egypt at this point, and it is significant aid. there should be no misunderstanding about that. these have f-16s, 200abrhams's tanks, powerful weapons of war. >> a deal, lou, made back in 2010 with the mubarak regime committed to keeping the base with israel. it's now turned over to a regime that's committed to the destruction of israel, notwithstanding what they say, and a regime which is part of the global movement, the muslim brotherhood that the justice department proved in u.s. court in 2008 is committed to the, as they said, the elimination and
for refusing to let the men forced the law. nationalize council is also here. and israel unilaterally attacking key syrian assets and an overnight bombing. former pentagon official is also our guest tonight. would you want to begin with the u.s. economy shocking the experts in shrinking for the first time since the recession. fox news iran house correspondent has our report. >> less than two weeks that the president said his second inaugural address that an economic recovery had begun to let the congress -- commerce departments and not so fast. slow growth slashed economic growth from three pa 1% to-1 to the persons in the fourth. they downplayed the report and give republicans part of the blame. >> consumer spending has been rising. >> comments about using the threat of across-the-board spending cuts not as a sequestered for leveraged for fiscal asperity. some members constituents are fighting. >> and put the damage on the economy as a -- you know, to achieve some political roles here in washington seems like a bad idea. >> accusing republicans of pushing spending cuts for their own sake. some
recently, in 2010, playing a key role in managing israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. ladies and gentlemen, major general retired amos yadler. [applause] now, let's get out on the stage the equally formidable duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution, be it resolved, the world cannot tolerate an iran with nuclear weapons capability, vali nasser and fareed zukaria. [applause] dean vali nasser leads john's hopkins university prestigious school of university international studies, born in tehran, one of the world's top experts on the political and social developments of iran and the author of two best-selling books on iran and sits on the state department's influential foreign affairs policy board and has served as a senior adviser as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrooke, former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs ove
their grievances against the united states and israel and, most importantly, their grievances against their own unrepresentative, pro-western governments and regimes. and then what the islamic republic has done is it has aligned itself with those publics, with public opinion itself in the middle east to constrain hostile governments from attacking it. just think about how bahrain's already-angry, largely shia population would react if we used our fifth fleet based in bahrain to attack the islamic republic today. u.s. military planners could hope that bahrain's population would be passive, as i think they assumed maybe each five years ago -- maybe even five years ago, but today that clearly seems reckless. for all the ridiculing many american policy elites do of the islamic republic, the islamic republic's appeal to regional publics actually works. it works to constrain the united states and hostile, unrepresentative, pro-western governments neighboring iran. iran has also worked to reip force these -- reinforce these aspects of it soft power strategy over a number of years by picking what we wo
. why doesn't he moved to israel and joined the knesset because many of us don't feel like he feels about israel and their politicians should not have to be vetted by a coward like lieberman or lindsey graham. host: why are you calling them a coward? caller: it is all about israel to these clowns and i am sick of it. we give these people $3 billion per year and all they do is give us guff. that is why. host: we are taking your phone calls this morning. about foreign policy challenges in 2013. this is the opening section of "usa today" - >there are other stories in noting that the former senator, chuck hagel, when he was in office, approved about $38 billion in aid for the jewish state along with multiple trips to beat -- to meet with leaders there. that is a little bit of background on chuck hagel. david, indianapolis, democratic caller -- caller: good morning. i wanted to comment on the changes in the foreign policy that we will see. i agree with the last speaker, i believe the israelis need to be rained down. these guys used hawks, they elect hawks to take over their government an
plausible enemy which you would use f-16s and stanks israel. >> greta: who gets the money from this? who is making all the money from this purchase? >> i don't know whether they are surplus or corporations in america that are building them. i just don't know the answer to that. >> in either case, there are lots of other markets in the world. egypt is very bad place to send weapons. >> greta: why would we do that? >> to prop up the egyptian government. >> greta: why would we do that? we have hillary clinton on the topic, is it money or political? >> originally we were doing it because the agreement was reached under mubarak when he was dictator and part of a long term relationship with egypt which had been very supportive of israel. now it's a different world and i suspect our bureaucracy hasn't caught up with reality. there is no other plausible --. >> greta: egypt is not being threatened by any neighbor. israel is not -- >> you got deserts to the west, deserts to the west and east. >> they want to brag and say, we have f-16s and tanks or they want to use them against somebody. >> they h
questions about his past statements and positions, especially about israel and iran. at times, hagel seemed to struggle to answer some of those tough questions and other times he gave answers he later had to clarify. let's go to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. jessica, it was a tough, tough day for chuck hagel? >> reporter: so far it has been, wolf. chuck was battered by republicans, forcing some stumbles and bruising. so far, no knockout blow but the day of questioning is not over yet. former senator chuck hagel sat at the table alone fielding hostile questions, including one-time close friend, john mccain. >> i want to know if you were right or wrong. that's a direct question. i expect a direct answer. >> i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> reporter: that exchange centered on hagel's past opposition to the iraq surnl, a surge that mccain championed. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs or my record. we must use all our tools of american power to protect our citizens and ou
's committed to keeping peace with israel. i want to take a moment and remind our president before he delivers the remaining parts of the deal to morsi, exactly who he's dealing with, mohammed morsi is a muslim brotherhood member, a 9/11 truther, called the israelis descendents of apes and pigs and called them vampires and killers and stands with the palestinians and told an iranian news agency he'll reconsider the camp david accord and pushed through a sharia focused constitution and one more thing, mr. president, he called you a liar and america the enemy. here with the reaction of the troubling story former new york mayor rudy guiliani. you know the first questions that come to my mind are, why would anyone give these planes when they likely will be used to attack israel? >> it's hard to figure out exactly what else they could be used for. explain to me where egypt is threatened. egypt is not threatened by saudi arabia, egypt is not threatened by iran. egypt is not threatened by russia, china, the united states. what conceivable reason would they have for these jets other than to do somethi
about israel. in 2006 he gave an interview tomorrow toer middle east envoy aaron david miller. hagel said the following. >> the jewish lobby intimidates a lot of people up there. i'm a united states senator. i'm a united states senator. >> reporter: hagel favors direct talks with iran and as well as hamas. and he was one of two senators to vote against sanctioning iran. >> he consistently advocated weakness with respect to our enemies, with respect to the nation of iran. he has opposed sanctions over and over again and the job of the secretary of defense is to be a serious, credible strength and deterrent and, unfortunately i think weakness in a secretary of defense invites could not flick because bulllies don't respect weakness. >> reporter: his defenders point out that chuck hagel valiantly in vietnam. he received two purple hearts there. knows what war is all about but his critics pipt out that was against the surge in iraq. he called it the biggest foreign policy mistake. he warned it would be the biggest foreign policy mistake since vietnam. obviously the surge turned out differ
: all right, thank you, i think, bill. from the cold weather to the cold shoulder in israel. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu returned to office, but ever so barely. so a day after we inaugurate a u.s. president, with whom mr. netanyahu has had chilly relations, he survives to fight another day n. tel aviv, we have the implications of all of this. >> reporter: neil, right now, if the exit polls hold, we will see israeli prime minister netanyahu with a third term, but a very weak prime minister. it is not winner take all here. we will break down how it works here. their 120 members in the kines kines -- knesset. and they break down how many votes each party gets. mr. netanyahu got 31 seats, you need 60-plus one, meaning 61 to form a government. mr. netanyahu in his usual groups of friends got many less than they were expected to. the exit polls put them at 61 seats, which makes you a very weak prime minister. now begins the horse trading, over the next coming week, we will see mr. netanyahu make a lot of tough choices. he promised the nationalistic party he won't make a peace
israel or other things we are better able to effect that and negate if we are participating. and then if we cease to pay the dues and so forth to take a different attitude than we see we sort of lose the opportunity to protect our friends which we want to have the are getting close to the line that would be very damaging if there were any effort to take israel for instance or any other country, if there is any effort to try to invoke other power that is the kind of unilateral action that we would feel very, very strongly against it and see it as extremely counterproductive. my hope is that, you know, there were just elections yesterday. we don't know what kind of government will be formed or where they will go, but my prayer is that perhaps this can be a moment where we can renew some kind of effort to get the parties into a discussion to have a different track than we have been on over the course of the last couple of years. and i would like to reserve all of the capacity to be able to do that, so i'm just going to stop with what i've said, but unilateral efforts are not he
nt anti-israel? we'll ask one of the more prominent voteses in the pro-israeli community. we have the head of the anti-defamation league. we'll talk to him at 9:30 a.m. eastern time. martha: fox news alert. the possibility of broad new gun control laws coming your way. the white house is considering multiple new regulations that go way beyond just a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, much discussed in the wake of what happened in newtown, connecticut of course. now according to "the washington post" democrats want universal background checks and a national database that would track all gun sales. they also want to strengthen mental health checks and stiffen penalties for carrying guns near schools or giving them to minors. this obviously comes in the wake of that horrific story carried out about three weeks ago in newtown connecticut. but many lawmakers say this proposal they believe, does not solve the issues at hand and it goes too far. republican senator ted cruz says that the newtown tragedy is being exploited he feels. >> within minutes we saw politicians run
to, or is it about what he has said or what they believe he may believe about israel and iran? >> my sense is that it's mostly about israel and iran and that they believe that as secretary of defense who says the kinds of things he says, not so much -- not exclusively the policy positions. but one of the reasons people have liked chuck hagel over the years, a lot of reasons reporters like him and his supporters like him is he's a pretty free-speaking guy. he's iconoclastic. he's willing to say things and think about things that is outside not just party orthodoxy but outside what the mainstream foreign policy establishment thinks and that for a lot of republicans to do that on israel, to do that on iran, for someone who's going to be running the pentagon i think they find that alarming. and there's other things. they resent him because he said nice things about the president. they resent him because he endorsed bob kerrey for senate. >> rose: and was against the iraq war. >> there's all those issues. >> rose: did the president have any choice after he floated the name because of what
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 197 (some duplicates have been removed)